A picture of the civil war in southern lady yankee spy a book by elizabeth varon

The ultimate finding in her case was, "no action to be taken. Elizabeth's father came to Richmond in at the age of 16 and, within twenty years, had built up a prosperous hardware business and owned several slaves.

Richmond Unionists worked with Van Lew to provide escapees with safe houses, with passes and disguises, and with guides and contacts to take them to Union lines.

Elizabeth Van Lew

Her father was a prosperous hardware merchant until his death in Varon's powerful biography brings Van Lew to life, showing how she used the stereotypes of the day to confound Confederate authorities who suspected her, but could not believe a proper Southern lady could be a spyeven as she brought together Union sympathizers at all levels of society, from slaves to slaveholders.

Grant even gave Van Lew money for her services to the Union. Beymer to publish the first biography of Van Lew in Harper's Monthly.

Starting inarmy commanders took it upon themselves to initiate investigations of antiwar sentiment in those states. She relied on her family's wealth to bribe Confederate prison guards and officials, as well as her family's social standing, which she parlayed into numerous favors from influential Confederates, including the provost marshal.

She spent 10 days in jail before Van Lew paid her bail. Van Lew did not see herself as someone who betrayed the South; rather she believed that secessionists and Confederates were the traitors to Virginia's heritage of political moderation.

Such fugitives became valuable means of transmitting military intelligence, and by early Van Lew had become an active agent in smuggling that information first to Benjamin Butler, stationed at nearby Fort Monroe, and later to Ulysses S.

And to unsubscribe register, please contact by phone is freekindleclubebooks. Her family mansion proved a safe way station for fugitives on the perilous journey beyond Confederate lines. But her Unionism, Republican politics, and outspoken support of racial justice earned her a lifetime of scorn in the former Confederate capital.

So in order to tell her story I had to use as much imagination as research. Return to the Dictionary of Virginia Biography Search page. Grant named her postmaster of Richmond--a top notch smash with custom for this politically influential post.

Butler enlisted her and her fellow Unionists into Federal service. Revere, whom she had aided during the war, donated the tombstone. Varon found a record at St. See if you have enough points for this item.

A lot of people would have benefitted from saying so, You're always stuck with the sources that you got. Not one of the four daily Richmond newspapers, however, hinted at mental instability in the obituaries they published, although two of them printed very unflattering caricatures of her.

Mary Bowser, who had been enslaved by the Van Lew family, was sent North to get an education.

Elizabeth Van Lew (1818–1900)

Varon describes a woman who was very much a product of her time and place, yet continually took controversial stands--from her early efforts to free her family's slaves, to her daring wartime activities and beyond. Her grave was unmarked until the relatives of Union Colonel Paul J. In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: It was adorned with stately columns.

Van Lew secretly freed some of her slaves or allowed them to live as if free, but her family had de jure ownership of at least a half dozen people well into the Civil War. Spying on the most elite members of the Confederacy required the deception of more than just the enemy.Varon, Elizabeth R.

Varon, Elizabeth R. 1963-

Southern Lady, Yankee Spy: The True Story of Elizabeth Van Lew, A Union Agent in the Heart of the Confederacy. New York: Oxford University Press, Organizations. In Southern Lady, Yankee Spy, historian Elizabeth Varon provides a richly researched account of the woman who led what one historian called "the most productive espionage operation of the Civil War." Under the nose of the Confederate government, Van Lew ran a spy ring that gathered intelligence, hampered the Southern war effort, and helped.

VARON, Elizabeth R.

Mary Bowser

Southern lady, Yankee spy; the true story of Elizabeth Van Lew, a Union agent in the heart of the Confederacy. Oxford.

p. illus. notes. index. Southern Lady, Yankee Spy: The True Story of Elizabeth Van Lew, a Union Agent in the Heart of the Confederacy [Elizabeth R. Varon] on agronumericus.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Northern sympathizer in the Confederate capital, daring spymaster, postwar politician: Elizabeth Van Lew was one of the most remarkable figures in American history.

In Southern Lady, Yankee Spy, historian Elizabeth Varon provides a gripping, richly researched account of the woman who led what one historian called "the most productive espionage operation of the Civil War."5/5(2). Read "Southern Lady, Yankee Spy The True Story of Elizabeth Van Lew, a Union Agent in the Heart of the Confederacy" by Elizabeth R.

Varon with Rakuten Kobo. Northern sympathizer in the Confederate capital, daring spymaster, postwar politician: Elizabeth Van Lew was one of the.

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A picture of the civil war in southern lady yankee spy a book by elizabeth varon
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